Successful Ways to Change Your Career

by Dr. Regina Campbell

Career CornerOver the past several years the economic downturn has resulted in many that have faced the question what now? Many were laid off and that has forced some to rethink their career. Or maybe you’ve survive the debilitating economic and hasn’t felt the impact of a weak economic but you’ve been pressed within to do something different; you may be bored with your current career or just simply need a challenge.

Here are tips for making a career change regardless if you were forced by life current events or an inner desire to want more and do something different.
1. Courage – it takes courage to move from the familiar to the unfamiliar; to the known to the unknown and from what’s comfortable to what’s uncomfortable. You have to know that you may have to come out of your comfort zone to gain a new skill. Thus it takes the courage to face your fear.
2. A willingness to learn a “new craft” – If you are going to embark upon a new career you may have to learn a new set of skills. You may have to go back to school take additional courses; most important you must have a learning spirit a willingness to study and master a new craft. It is imperative to find a mentor or expert in that field.
3. Explore your options – If you are going to change your career it’s so important that you explore the options of a new career and what would be the necessary process for you to go through the transition. Many times people fall short on exploring their options by not surveying what all it will take to change careers. For instance you must explore the pay scale, what new skills you’ll need and what cost are associated if any with the change. Also consider the impact on your finances and your family if there are any.
4. Passion – The question you must answer is do you have the passion for this new career. Will you wake up daily with enthusiasm and a strong will to succeed despite having to go through a transition period? If you are not passionate about the new career opportunity and the future outcome then you should not move in that direction. It is the passion that will give you the drive during those difficult days of learning a new skill, during those times of uncertainty of whether you will succeed or not succeed. More importantly you’ll need passion to face and conquer your fears when you are out of your comfort zone.

In addition below is an article from the Forbes Magazine written by Kathy Caprino

The 5 ways to tell if you should change careers are:
1. You are chronically worn out, exhausted and depleted.
If you experience chronic illness, debilitation, and exhaustion, the first place I’d look is your work. Most of us spend more waking hours working than doing anything else, and I can tell you from firsthand experience that if you don’t like your work, it won’t like you back, and overly-stressful, misaligned work can very easily make your body break down.
2. Your skills, responsibilities, and tasks are not you at all.
This can be a shocker for some folks that you might have become very good at work that you hate. For example, I used to be really good at presenting to a board room of senior leaders the facts, data and new marketing strategies about the membership products I managed, but inside it was a horrible struggle.
3. You’ve come to the point where your salary no longer makes up for the boredom and emptiness you feel.
Most people who dislike like their work but are reluctant to change would say it’s their fear about walking away from the money that keeps them stuck. I work with women who are used to making $150,000 a year and more, and they don’t want to part with it. But at some point, many are saying, “Hang on here – I have this money, but I hate how I spend my life making it.” They begin to rethink their priorities and their abilities, and then they open their eyes to new ways they can make the money they need without risking the farm or giving up their lives for it.
4. Despite all the “right” choices you made in your career, the outcome feels very wrong.
So many professionals have made all the “right” choices, done everything that was expected of them, so when they wake up bored to death with their work, they’re shocked and confused. The thing to realize here is that the “right” choices usually had to do with pleasing others, stroking your ego, or taking work or a promotion that fell in your lap, rather than asking yourself the tough questions like “Is this where I belong?”
5. You have the irrepressible feeling that your talents and abilities could/should be used in a totally different (more creative and impactful) way.
I used to say to myself every day in my corporate life, “I know I’m made for better things than this.” But I didn’t listen to myself – I thought I was crazy. If you think, “There’s got to be more in life,” then there IS more to life than what you’re currently doing – no question.
There’s another way to live and work, even though you can’t see it yet. Here’s an example. I have a client who worked in media and public relations for a large, well-known firm for many years, and was laid off last year. She had a big dream – of starting her own consulting business, where she could call the shots, partner with colleagues she respected, and also work on projects that had personal meaning to her. She fantasized about working on retainer (not hourly) in her consultancy, offering her digital marketing talents to startup companies that were just figuring out what they wanted to be when they grew up. But she was too scared to go for it.
After being rejected from five straight interviews at big firms within two months, she realized it was a sign, and decided to muster the courage to plow ahead to pursue her own business.
That was three months ago. Now, she has three new clients, is loving making a difference to budding startups she cares about, and is proud of what she’s doing. People are asking her advice, and paying handsomely for it. With just two more clients, she’ll be earning very close to what she was when she was laid off. She’s full of hope, excitement and possibility.